What does Friday do?

Alex Wright

4 minute read

The substance at the heart of Friday is really material, so explaining what we do and the value we bring, clearly, is really important.

We have genuine, specialist, practice-leading expertise in service design, modern engineering and product delivery. We work in agile mixed-discipline teams, that include our client’s people, that ship digital product in a series of fast, valuable increments.

This rubs off on our clients and changes how they work, so they’re more agile, transparent, customer centric, faster, etc. - right at the core of their business. This gives them competitive advantage, and builds value.

It’s a mix of change-through-making and capability-building-through-collaboration.

We just haven’t been good at shouting about it to make Friday visible, or even explaining it simply to make Friday easy to understand.

This isn’t a pivot. We aren’t changing direction. We just need a crisp way of declaring what we do (the problem we solve, and for whom) to the outside world.

Here goes.

I’ll offer up "the answer" first, and then explain the journey we took to get to it.

Our purpose is:

To make organisations work brilliantly for people by digitally transforming them from the ground up

We do it for:

Senior customer-proposition people, in high-touch service organisations

The way we do that, explained in a sentence is:

Transforming customer experience by digitising core products and services at speed

The way we summarise that into a single under-the-logo strapline is:

Core business digital

To get to this, we did a number of “eat your own dog food” things.

1. We looked at the market.

We’re at the intersection of three types of organisation. We share some of the characteristics of all of them, and reject some of the characteristics of all of them. Our clients tell us that they love this balance.


We’re a bit like a digital agency.

We’re design led (we apply creativity to address specified problems to improve people’s experience), but we’re not fluffy or campaign-y. We relish really hard strategic and technical design problems.

We’re a bit like a management consultancy.

We have deep business change impact, we’re boardroom credible, and we’re commercial. But we actually make and ship things, not just advice.

We’re a bit like an IT systems integrator.

We have deep engineering, integration and delivery skill - enough to make magic happen at scale. But we’re not slow and clumsy, or pushing products and vendor lock-in.

2. We examined and spoke to our customers and prospects

The organisations:

Most of our clients are established organisations that have a service relationship with customers - some kind of account that customers log-into.

They’re often big and regulated with legacy infrastructure, facilities, culture and talent. And they’re in highly disrupted sectors.

But they’re ambitious. They’re trying to capitalise on their history, customer base, market position, supply chain, brand and so on, while at the same time trying to accelerate and imbue their organisation with well governed agility. This is heart surgery on the marathon runner, mid race. It involves change right at the core of the business. And it’s not new. It’s been underway for a while.

The people:

We looked at the domain expertise of the people in those organisations who’ve bought from us over the last three years.

They own “customer propositions” for their organisation - the delivery of core products and services.

They work at the intersection of product, digital, operations, IT and marketing. They shape, make, price and run the thing so people will use it. And they present and promote the thing so people will want it.

Increasingly, they’re the “Chief Customer Officer”.

So, our clients and prospects are: Senior customer-proposition people, in high-touch service organisations.

Their challenges:

I interviewed our clients and prospects and found clear patterns about the pressure they face and the needs they have.

At the heart of all of this is the need for external help to change the core of the business fast enough to keep up with customer expectations and competitors, and build the capabilities to keep doing it.

For our clients, the easy or peripheral bits of digital transformation are mostly done. Now it’s the really hard stuff, that needs tackling - the core-business, core products and core services - for which they need:

  1. Expert capability in service design, modern engineering and digital product delivery

  2. Close collaboration to acquire new capability and ways of working

  3. Boardroom-credible expert counsel and coaching (from makers) to support change.

We do that.

3. We examined our “why”.

We’ve long believed in the Internet as a force for good. (Yes, this is a challenging belief to sustain right now).

But the Internet can and does create transparency and meritocracy, and places power, knowledge and agency into the hands of people.

This forces organisations to be usefully valuable and relevant to those people, or to wither. I believe this is A Good Thing. And bringing digital into the core of an organisation necessarily re-orients the organisation to the customer.

So, our purpose is about consciously doing that – bringing the customer and the Internet into the core of organisations, and building better digital products and services.

This transforms the customer experience and, brick-by-brick, transforms the whole organisation from the ground up, so that it works brilliantly for people.

So, our purpose is:

To make organisations work brilliantly for people by digitally transforming them from the ground up

We do it for:

Senior customer-proposition people, in high-touch service organisations

The way we do that, explained in a sentence is:

Transforming customer experience by digitising core products and services at speed

The way we summarise that into a single under-the-logo strapline is:

Core business digital


Have we succeeded in making Friday easy to understand? I’d really welcome your thoughts and feedback, drop an email to alex.wright@wearefriday.com

Alex Wright

CEO
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